Marshall Bloom

Marshall Bloom

Marshall Bloom

Power Words

"Hello", "Tell me about yourself", "How can we work together?"

Where were you born? 

Dallas, Texas

What school did you attend? 

Washington University in St. Louis, MO for undergrad and med school

What gained your interest in the NIH? 

I was always interested in science and became interested in research into infectious diseases while in Med School and a Pediatric intern at St Louis Children’s Hospital. After that internship, I went to the NIH at Rocky Mountain Labs in Montana and have been here since.

How can you help improve the composition of the STEM education pipeline for Native American students? 

I try to do this by interacting with staff at the University of Montana and 2 Tribal Colleges. I host tours and visits by groups of Native American students.

What is your most important accomplishment to date?  

I have received a lot of scientific recognition over the years, but I consider my most important accomplishment to be the number of trainees that have gone onto to successful careers in science and medicine.

How did you choose your career?  

I was always interested in science and became interested in research into infectious diseases while in Med School and a Pediatric intern at St Louis Childrens Hospital. After that internship, I went to the NIH at Rocky Mountain Labs in Montana and have been here since. I have had a very successful career as a virologist and was appointed to be Associate Director from Science here at RML in 2002.

What types of community programs do you feel need to be more visible in Indian Country?  

In Montana, Indian Country covers a huge area, so a concerted effort to bring STEM outreach to the students and communities is a major proble, requiring a lot of time and effort. Programs should be developed to identify Native American students with STEM interests early - like in middle school, and then make it possible for them to participate in age - appropriate STEM outreach

What are ways to provide better STEM education for Native American students?  

One idea would be for NIH to partner with universities in Indian Country - like Montana - and host STEM-rich summer programs for Native American students.

How can Tribal colleges build stronger partnerships with institutions like NIH? 

The tribal colleges represent a huge untapped potential source of Native American students with STEM interests. However, these colleges are very resource poor and often isolated from major STEM centers. Outreach to these institutions is critical, but difficult and time consuming.

What does success mean to you?  

I have received a lot of scientific recognition over the years, but I consider my most important accomplishment to be the number of trainees that have gone onto to successful careers in science and medicine.